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Sat 29, Apr, 2017
A Maltese dog performs tricks indoors. (Photo by Ed Yourdon)
Five Fun Indoor Dog Exerc

A dog that licks and chews his paws, legs or other parts of his body is – well, just being a dog. However, when your pet’s grooming behavior becomes a chronic habit, it can lead to serious injury and irritation. Beyond inflammation to the topical area, obsessive behavior like this can be an indication of something more serious than a sore foot or a minor insect bite.

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Wed 21, Dec, 2016
holiday safety tips
Holiday Safety Tips for Y

Holiday safety for household pets is the timely topic of the first PSA from L.A. Animal Services‘ Animal Army. Pet Me Happy presents it here as a public service to you and your four-legged family member(s). The holiday season is a joyous time of year when everyone is decorating, cooking and coming together to celebrate and create memories with their families, including their furry family members. With all the hustle and bustle during this time of year, we can easily forget about the potential dangers that may come along with all the festivities. LA Animal Services wants you to keep the following holiday safety tips in mind: 1. Beware of décor Our beloved pets often see holiday décor as something to play with or eat that can be very dangerous to them. Tinsel, if consumed, can cause intestinal blockage and breakable ornaments and other glass decorations can cause injuries. Put tinsel and fragile decorations up high and out of reach from your pet. Be careful of electric lights and wires that can cause burns if the cords are chewed. If you put up a Christmas tree consider tying it down to a door frame so your pet doesn’t tip it over. If the tree is real, keep the water covered and inaccessible. Tree water may contain fertilizer and other harmful chemicals. 2. Flowers and festive plants You probably worry over poinsettias making your pets sick, the truth is that these festive plants only cause mild to moderate gastrointestinal irritation. However, […]

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Mon 05, Sep, 2016
A Pitbull dog mid-air, running after its chew toy with its owner standing close by.
Exercises to Wear Out You

A dog that licks and chews his paws, legs or other parts of his body is – well, just being a dog. However, when your pet’s grooming behavior becomes a chronic habit, it can lead to serious injury and irritation. Beyond inflammation to the topical area, obsessive behavior like this can be an indication of something more serious than a sore foot or a minor insect bite.

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Fri 26, Aug, 2016
A mixed Labrador female dog runs after the chew toy the dog trainer is holding.
What Makes a Good Dog Tra

What makes for a good dog trainer? Love and affection for animals seems to be the most basic quality needed. Positive dog training and rewards-based training are always the best approaches. Early dog trainers like Karen Pryor recognized that rewarding a four-legged pupil with a clicker sound to designate the animal has acted properly on the cue, and using a reward such as a dog treat worked very similarly to training a dolphin. Along with some verbal praise, positive dog training can work wonders. “Practical Training” by Stephen Hammond (published in 1882) was among the early training guides that advocated such a method. Methods for dog instruction became a bit more formalized and exacting in the early 20th century as the need for service dogs increased. Konrad Most’s “Training Dogs” (1910) reflected new discoveries in animal psychology at the time. Many of the book’s basic principles are still in use today, though some of the advice about using “compulsive inducements” (like switches and spiked collars) seem overly harsh and antiquated by modern standards. Leading dog trainers like William R. Koehler have emphasized the need for standardized, reliable cues in dealing with dogs. Positive rewards combined with encouragement support the dog’s positive behavior – with rewards, not harshness. Good dog trainers apply these methods with the individual capacities and temperaments of the dogs – and their owners – in mind. Every situation is different and some dogs simply learn faster than others. But start with the premise that every dog is a […]

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